Skip to main content

About your Search

20121222
20121230
Search Results 0 to 8 of about 9 (some duplicates have been removed)
, the pentagon renewed its formal threats against us in relation to ongoing publishing, but also extremely seriously in relation to ongoing, what they call, solicitation. that is asking sources publicly , send us important material and we will publish it. they say that itself is a crime. this is not simply a case about we received some information back in 2010 and have been publishing it, and they say that was the crime. the pentagon is maintaining a line that wikileaks inherently as an institution held military and government whistleblowers to come forward with this information as a crime. >> talk more, michael ratner, about the emails of stratford. >> as you have covered on the show before, they had a lot of important information about surveillance of everybody from peta to the yesmen, to u.s. government agencies. it puts out a regular intelligence newsletter. it does not work for private clients by major corporations, etc.. one of the things that came out and the stratfor emails are listed people who apparently are subscribers to the newsletter, and there are thousands of those emails,
the wall street journal, or the pentagon indicated they wanted to maintain 6000 to 15th thousand u.s. troops following 2014. that is the issue under discussion now. there's approximately around 340 0,000 afghan security forces in place, including the police. the pentagon recently indicated i don't believe there was a major unit capable of operating independently from nato support. there was some manipulation of the metrics they were using where the things appear to be making more progress than perhaps they were. that came out in a white paper. what will be the long term success or failure of the afghan national security forces is yet to be determined. they need about $4.1 billion a year to continue at that level, which is more than the entire government revenues in afghanistan. so it's gone to take a long-term commitment of foreign powers to maintain that size of armed forces. the afghans have proven that they are excellent fighters. the question is will they be excellent soldiers for the government of afghanistan? host: one other question, how stable do you think the karzai govern
and exchanges. >>> a bus bomb targeting. we are live from the pentagon with details. >>> his time has come again, a man from the '60s is getting a start again, lester chambers joins us back. >>> welcome back to "starting point." we've been talking about the blizzard and storm warnings from the deep south all the way to new england. we'll look at seymour, indiana, lexi sheen has drawn the short straw, she's from wlky and getting hammered. >> reporter: that's right, drew. things have calmed down. let me give you a look behind me. you can't see the tire tracks from where we came in 5:30 but the roadways are snow covered, two, two and a half inches have fallen since 4:00 this morning. we barely missed having a white christmas in seymour, indiana. indiana state police are advisi advising people to stay off the roads. they are urging everyone to stay home if it is at all possible and kind of a good day to do that. we were pointing out earlier this is the good snow, the stuff the kids like to play with, snowballs, snowmen, all of that good stuff but it is still dangerous. the roadway is slippery, slush
, but unfortunately members of the pentagon said this is all a big deception being done by bin laden to take everyone i saw posted on his name. after the attack, they got very aggressive in terms of the policies they decided and took on. what you see in this book is about one and two decisions, how fast they were made, sometimes so badly they were made, but also some canonically great decisions. >> kurt eichenwald, use the words secretive nice. what did you find click >> some of them had to do, some of them had to do the simple things such as the knowledge they had within the government about the actual connections between al qaeda and saddam hussein. one of the most surprising things to me this thursday defense intelligence agency report, classified report that came out in 2002 that specifically said our intelligence on weapons of mass destruction is terrible. we can't establish any of the things we say to the public. i quote from that document pretty excessively. so that was disturbing and really did seem like it's something at the preconception conifers except you. if something didn't, it was taug
who are very upset with the cuts that would hit the pentagon. it may be difficult to rally republican votes of the cannot turn off the sequester. on the democratic side, the estate tax could be a problem. the republicans are insistent that the estate tax stay at current levels, which is exempting the state of $55 million at a relatively late 35% above that level. many democrats would like to see -- in january it is expected to come -- taxes are expected to go up dramatically. as small as $1 million would be taxed. most democrats want to see something in the metal. they are adamant that we cannot exempt states as large as $5 million. that could be another sticking point. >> do we expect anything going on today? if not, what is the earliest of the senators will come back in for session tomorrow? caller: i think the senate is due back in at 1:00. the house is due at 6:30. the house is the big question mark here. it is very difficult to imagine what could pass the house. as for today, that is an excellent question. the senate is not in here the house is not an. my understanding as we are
that preparation before running into the pentagon and he has done a is he person job. very tough job. even he said that we face some dire devastating times ahead if sequestration goes ahead. chuck hagel seems to think that we can cut, quote, more the bloat out of the pentagon. there probably is some over there. but you need to understand the system right, given of the republican opposition i don't know that the president gets a lot of credit for bipartisanship. more likely the cuts that they agree on. lt. colonel bob maginnis thanks so much we appreciate it. >> thanks, dave. >> small businesses set to take big hits in 2013. that could take an effect on your wallet. we'll explain next. my pet chicken just saved my life. how this hero bird came to the rescue of an entire family. and that's not even the coolest part of this story. i'm sticking around. mine was earned off vietnam in 1968. over the south pacific in 1943. i got mine in iraq, 2003. usaa auto insurance is often handed down from generation to generation. because offers a superior level of protection, and because usaa's commitment to serve
, it is not a philanthropic act on the pentagon's part to instruct boeing to build. -- to build in the deficit areas of the u.s. it is pragmatic. the united states federal government -- unless europe is dollarized, unless they do not have dollars to spend purchasing -- unless those who do not have dollars are given dollars to spend purchasing, the net exports of those who have surpluses, then they will stop having surplus. this is the surplus recycling mechanism. thus, we have the 20 years of the golden age. the 1950's and the 1960's. a period of immense stability very low inflation. very low unemployment. universal growth. we had other problems. the lease from the macroeconomic point of view, it was a golden age. why did it end? because the global surplus of recycling mechanism could no longer be sustained. why? because the united states stopped having a surplus by the end of the 1960's. how can you recycle surplus if you cannot have it. -- if you do not have it? enter a young turk in 1971. actually, he was the american, but you know what i mean. well, paul volcker -- that name may ring a bell. in 1971, pau
knocked himself out. >> did the pentagon have review? >> no, didn't have fop once i'm retired from active due any i don't have to submit it to the pentagon unless i use classified information. so i avoided using any classified information but a lot of stuff was declassified right after the war. a lot of stuff was a matter of public record. so i had a great deal of material. the best thing i had was this, any war i ever fought most of instructions were sent by message back and forth. so you have hard copy record of every decision made. because of where we are today most of the orders and instructions are seventh back and forth by secured telephone. it became apparent that we're not going have a record of the decisions made unless we have a record ourselves. any time i had a conversation i wrote down what i said and what is being said to me. i had someone in there who would write down every time i made a decision and he would log it into a private journal that we kept of every decision that was happening during the war. if it had not been through that the book would not be written. >> where
Search Results 0 to 8 of about 9 (some duplicates have been removed)